Category Archives: flowers

Post-Fall Chrysanthemum Care

chrysanthemums are perennial plants

As chrysanthemum season winds down and the flowers change from beautiful yellows, oranges, and reds to dull, dark brown, gardeners need to trim these plants. In my view, when a plant has become unsightly, it is time to make changes for the greater good of the landscape. Continue reading

Amaryllis: A Holiday Tradition

flower

Charisma is an early blooming amaryllis, just in time for Christmas. Photo courtesy of Longfield Gardens.

Growing an amaryllis is easy, just plant and water. Unlike the spring blooming bulbs, an amaryllis does not need a chilling period. It is a tropical plant, hardy to Zones 9-12. Once planted, these large bulbs can bloom in time for the holidays, depending on the bulb. Although they may seem like an investment, you can coax the bulb to re-bloom the following year. Continue reading

Save Your Geraniums for Next Year

Red geraniums in a large container in May

When my mother lived in Vienna, Virginia, she grew red geraniums in large containers by the front door. Every fall she would pull the plants out of the containers, knock off the excess soil, and place the plants on a shelf in the basement. There was one small window allowing very little light. Every summer, these plants would come back to life and she never had to purchase more plants. Continue reading

A Fall-Blooming Culinary Herb: Pineapple Sage

Currently, my pineapple sage plants (Salvia elegans) are blooming in my garden, their bright scarlet flowers are attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. Members of the salvia or sage family, pineapple sage plants are herbaceous, tender perennial herbs. I have two pineapple sage plants, which I bought last year as tiny babies, and I often use their leaves and flowers in the kitchen. Continue reading

Deer-Proof Bulbs for Spring Flowers

snowdrop blossoms in the woodsFall is the time to purchase spring-blooming bulbs in the Washington DC metro area. There is a wide variety of choices but if you have a severe deer problem, you may want to plant deer-proof bulbs. I know, you say, there is no such thing as “deer-proof” but with bulbs there are a few that are actually poisonous. I spoke with Brent Heath of Brent and Becky’s Bulbs in Gloucester, VA, who explained the difference between deer-proof and deer-resistant. Continue reading

Heirloom Flowers: Four O’Clocks

yellow four o’clocks in my garden, 8:30 pm

A few years ago my family visited Monticello in the summer. I was struck by how large Thomas Jefferson’s four o’clocks (Mirabilis jalapa) were compared to mine. I also liked the fact that it was a plant he grew and could still be grown today as an heirloom. Continue reading

Free Local Gardening Newsletter, Complete with Giveaway

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, an e-newsletter about gardening in the DC metropolitan area. This free monthly communication lists recently published gardening books, articles, and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the upcoming May 2020 Pegplant’s Post, one lucky subscriber will receive Heartbreaker, one of the newest varieties in the Hollywood Hibiscus line.

Heartbreaker has orange petals with yellow-gold veining and a white center. He will only get about 3 to 4 feet tall, perfect for containers. He is one of the most recent stars to be introduced in the Hollywood line of tropical hibiscus plants, along with other stars such as Bombshell, Chatty Cathy, and Disco Diva. This award-winning collection grown by J. Berry Nursery features plants that bloom all summer long, unfazed by DC’s hot and humid summers.  Their large, colorful flowers attract pollinators and add a splash of color to the deck, patio, or poolside. My plants always put a smile on my face, they practically cover the foliage with such happy blossoms. The Hollywood Hibiscus line is known for compact, tropical hibiscus plants that produce many flowers per plant, in a wide range of flower colors.  If you are not already a Pegplant’s Post subscriber, type in your e-mail now at pegplant.com for a chance to win one Heartbreaker in a 2-gallon plastic container.

Now That You Have Seeds, Order Bulbs for Summer Blooms!

Many gardeners focus on obtaining seed in the spring to start their garden. Now that summer is around the corner, don’t forget to order summer-blooming bulbs such as alliums, cannas, crinums, dahlias, lilies, gladiolus, and iris. For interesting foliage, try caladiums, colocasias, and alocasias. Below is a list of companies that sell bulbs in alphabetical order. For other companies that primarily sell seeds and may also sell bulbs, click on the “Seed Companies” tab on pegplant.com. Continue reading

Early Spring Bloomers: Dwarf Irises

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Harmony

It is the end of January and already I can see the spiky green emerging from the mass of dead, brown leaves. Dwarf irises are one of my earliest bloomers in my zone 7 Virginia garden. These irises are only 4-5 inches tall and bloom solitary flowers. Mine have been in my garden for a long time, nothing bothers them. Usually they bloom in early March. This year we have had such a mild winter, I think I will see flowers in February.

J.S. Dijt

J.S. Dijt

Also known as netted iris, dwarf irises (Iris reticulata) are very small bulbs, covered with a fibrous netting. There are many cultivars; flower colors range from light to dark blue or light to dark purple. Preferring full sun and well-drained soil, they thrive in rock gardens, on steps and terraces, in containers, and can be forced to bloom indoors in pots. The flowers can be cut for small desk top vases, bringing early spring cheer to the office or home.

They are available to plant in the fall, along with other bulbs, at local garden centers or through bulb companies. Because they are so small though, buy at least a handful. Plant with roots pointing down, spike pointing up, three inches deep and three inches apart. Hardy to zone 5, they die back in the summer and come back in the spring every year. In my garden, ‘J.S. Dijt’ and ‘Harmony’ have thrived for years with no pests or diseases.

Subscribe Now to Pegplant’s Post for a Chance to Win David Austin English Rose

One of David Austin’s English roses in the landscape. Photo courtesy of David Austin Roses.

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, an e-newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. This free monthly communication lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, recently published gardening books, and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the upcoming February 2020 Pegplant’s Post, one lucky subscriber will win a bare root English rose, courtesy of David Austin Roses.

A David Austin English rose needs no introduction. David Austin is one of the greatest rosarians and rose breeders in the world and the first to create a horticultural brand. In the early 1950s, David Austin began to create a more beautiful rose by combining the fragrance of old roses with the color range and repeat flowering habits of the modern roses. In 1961, he released his first commercial English rose, ‘Constance Spry’. Since then he has released more than 200 English roses. English roses are fragrant with many petals, creating a lush, full flower. The plants are disease resistant and bloom all season long.  The David Austin representative will work with the winner to determine the correct time for shipping and planting and to answer any questions about roses.