U.S. Botanic Garden’s Holiday Exhibit Features Iconic Roadside Attractions

With school closed for the holidays, the kids at home and the in-laws in town, what is the perfect indoor activity for all of you to enjoy? Take a trip downtown to U.S. Botanic Garden. Their holiday exhibit, Season’s Greenings: Roadside Attractions, will open Thanksgiving Day, November 23, 2017, and run through January 1, 2018. This year, the holiday show will feature roadside attractions. Model trains will wind around plant-based recreations of iconic American sights such as Texas’ Cadillac Ranch, Colorado’s hot-dog-shaped Coney Island Hot Dog Stand, South Dakota’s Corn Palace, and New Jersey’s Lucy the Elephant. All of these will be made from plants and other natural materials.

Plus there will be the signature Washington DC landmarks made from plant materials including the U.S. Capitol, the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial, and the new National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The U.S. Botanic Garden will be decorated for the season with wreaths, garlands, and more than 30 varieties of poinsettias — the perfect place for holiday family photos! The U.S. Botanic Garden is open to the public, free of charge, every day of the year from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Tuesdays and Thursdays in December, the Conservatory will be open until 8 p.m. for live seasonal music concerts and after-dark holiday exhibit viewing.

The Conservatory is located at 100 Maryland Ave. SW, on the southwest side of the U.S. Capitol. Visitors are encouraged to use public transportation. More information is available at www.USBG.gov/SeasonsGreenings

Discovering the Many Uses of Sage: Sage Butter Pats

washed but not quite dry sage leaves

For those of you who reach for that jar of dried sage once a year, I encourage you to grow the sage plant in your garden. You will discover that sage is a wonderful plant to have in your garden – its foliage adds texture and interest and you can pick the leaves to use in the kitchen whenever you need them.

Sage is a perennial plant, it will survive our zone 7 Virginia winters. It is an inexpensive plant to purchase in the spring from local garden centers. Mine have lived for many years and are drought and deer resistant. Sage prefers full sun and does not need a lot of care or fertilizer.  Although sage is not grown for its flowers, it does produce small lavender-colored flowers that attract beneficial insects and pollinators. There are many different types of sage but Salvia officinalis is the best one for culinary and medicinal use. This type has green, textured leaves that inspired me to make butter pats.

To make the butter pats, I clipped leaves from my sage plant and immersed in a large bowl of cool water to clean. Although I do not use sprays in the garden, I always submerge my herbs in water for at least 20 minutes to drown out any type of hidden pests. While the leaves were soaking, I took a quarter of a stick of butter out of the fridge and placed in a bowl to come to room temperature. When the leaves were “air dried” (not dried for preserving but dry as in no water left on the leaves) and the butter was soft, I put the butter in a bag, clipped the corner, and spread the soft butter on a leaf. I then put another leaf on top, much like a sandwich. These were placed on parchment paper on a tray and put inside the fridge to harden.

sage “sandwiches” with butter inside

The next day I experimented with a baked potato but these sage butter pats could be used for other vegetables or rolls, as a garnish, or for actually serving butter. The top leaf pulls off easily revealing the leaf pattern on the butter.

top sage leaf removed to reveal pattern on butter

Because the sage leaves have long stems, the entire sandwich leaf could be placed on a potato for guests to pull the top leaf back. Guests can pull the leaves off and place aside or fork the entire sandwich into the potato to have a buttery, sage-flavored baked potato for Thanksgiving dinner. Try sage butter pats to “wow” your guests!

sage butter sandwich on baked potato

Forcing Paperwhites To Stand Tall with a Shot of Liquor!

The first time I forced bulbs to bloom indoors was when I was taking a horticulture class at Northern Virginia Community College. We were given paperwhite bulbs (Narcissus tazetta) that we placed in a shallow dish of water and pebbles. Because I took this class before we ever even heard of the Internet, I visited Merrifield Garden Center to take a photo of a paperwhite bulb in a container to show what it looks like.

The green stalks on my bulbs appeared quickly.  In a few weeks, I had several tall but spindly stalks with clusters of white flowers. The flowers were quite fragrant, but because the stalks were flopping over I had to place the dish on the kitchen counter, making it look like gangly teenagers leaning against the kitchen wall.

I bet the current group of horticulture students do the same bulb forcing project but now add a shot of liquor to their bulbs. Researchers at the Flowerbulb Research Program at Cornell University have proven that using a dilute solution of alcohol shorten the stems. This is not new research but those new to gardening will appreciate this helpful tip. In fact, I bet the young undergrads have this cheat sheet in their back pocket:

After planting the bulbs in soil or stones and adding water, wait a week until the roots develop. When the green shoots grow to about 2 inches above the top of the bulbs, pour off the water and replace with a solution of 4 to 6 percent alcohol. Use gin, vodka, whiskey, rum, or tequila but do not use beer or wine. If it is a 40 percent distilled spirit, add 1 part of the alcohol to 7 parts water to yield a 5 percent solution. Rubbing alcohol (isopropyl alcohol) can be used as well. If it is 70 percent alcohol, dilute one part alcohol to 10 parts water.

From then on, use the solution instead of water for the bulbs. Make sure the waterline is below the base of the bulbs so the roots are drawing in the liquid and the bulbs are not sitting in it (or will rot).

This method results in a plant that is up to one-third shorter than would normally grow – no more gangly teenagers!  Because staking is difficult in a container of pebbles, this ensures that the stalks won’t flop over. It only takes about 3 weeks from planting to bloom time and the flowers last about 4 to 6 weeks. These bulbs do not need a chilling period, are relatively cheap, and are often sold in bins at garden centers in the fall. If you run out to your local garden center now, you could get flowers just in time for your holiday parties. Don’t forget to stop off at the liquor store!

The effect of alcohol on ‘Ziva’ paperwhite narcissus. Left is an untreated plant and right is a plant grown with 5% alcohol instead of water. Photo courtesy of FlowerBulb Research Program, Cornell University

 

Aloe Vera: The Plant That Keeps on Giving

Every May, I put my aloe plant outside on the deck to enjoy the summer sun and warmth. Aloe vera thrives despite my neglect, I barely remember to water her. By autumn, she has produced many “pups,” crowding inside the small pot, eager to escape. When the nights get too cold for them, I upturn the entire the pot, gently pull apart each pup, and nestle each into a small container of soil.  I replant the mother and move her in to my house while I box up the pups to bring to the office. Within hours of placing the box in the office kitchen, colleagues have helped themselves to a new plant, armed with growing instructions I have printed on strips of paper. My colleagues love free plants, needless to say it is much like leaving cookies in the kitchen. I have brought in baby aloe plants each fall for several years now and it is a joy for me to share as it is for my coworkers to receive.

Aloe vera is a succulent, perennial herb well known for healing burns. Snapping a leaf in two reveals a gel-like liquid that when applied to the burn offers pain relief and a fast healing process. The leaves actually have three sections: a thick outer rind, a thin slimy layer of cells, and the inner gel. Just beneath the rind is a bitter yellow substance called aloin, which causes intestinal irritation creating a laxative effect.  The inner gel is used to help with burns, sunburns, or as a skin moisturizer. Diluted with water, this gel can be ingested to sooth intestinal irritation. Although aloe’s beneficial effects have been documented for thousands of years, it was not until U.S. researchers discovered that aloe gel could quickly heal burns caused by x-rays and ultraviolet rays in the mid-1930s that interest soared. Today, aloe is recognized as an excellent first aid kit for disinfecting minor cuts, insect stings, and burns but researchers are still studying the plant. Aloe gel has more than 75 nutrients and 200 compounds.

Growing the plant is simple as long as you give it warmth and sun and good drainage. It can be grown indoors as a houseplant provided it gets sun, as in a southern exposure window or a sun room. It needs little water, I just let the rain water it outdoors. It will not tolerate the winters here in Virginia so in the fall before the nights hit forty degrees and below, bring it back indoors and then back outdoors in May. I have not fertilized mine but then I am a lazy fertilizer. I don’t try to ingest the leaves but I do use my plant for kitchen burns — I just cut off the outer leaf and slice in half to release the gel.

 

 

Peg’s Picks: November 2017 Gardening Events in the Washington DC Metro Area

This November there are more than 50 gardening events in the Washington DC Metro area, including many holiday-related workshops and exhibits.

1, Wednesday, Trees Matter Symposium, 7:30 am to 4:00 pm, fee and must register, Silver Spring Civic Center, 1 Veterans Place, Silver Spring, MD. https://www.montgomeryparks.org/about/divisions/arboriculture/trees-matter-symposium/

1, Wednesday, Film and Talk: Beatrix Farrand. 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Admission fee, pre-registration required. Walk in registration is based on availability. View documentary and listen to a discussion about pioneering work of landscape architect Beatrix Farrand. National Building Museum, 401 F Street NW, Washington DC. http://www.nbm.org

1, Wednesday, Holiday and Winter Containers, 7 to 8:30 pm, Free, advance registration requested. Offered twice, next time is November 4. Fairlington Community Center, 3308 S. Stafford Street, Arlington, VA. Hosted by the Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

1, Wednesday, Lecture: Bird Friendly Backyard, by Kerry Wixted, 7:00 pm. Free and open to the public. Annapolis Horticultural Society, St. Anne’s Parish Hall, 199 Duke of Gloucester Street, Annapolis, MD. http://www.annapolishorticulture.org

1, Wednesday, Getting your Garden Ready for Winter, 1:00 to 2:30 pm, fee and must register. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

2, Thursday, Gardener’s Focus: Specialty Mums, 2:45 pm. Fee is included in suggested donation. Also offered on Friday 11/3, Tuesday 11/7, Thursday 11/9, and Friday 11/10.  Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

2, Thursday, Lecture: Big Dreams, Small Garden by Marianne Wilburn, 7 to 8:00 pm, free and open to the public. Rust Library, 380 Old Waterford Road, NW, Leesburg, VA. Hosted by the Loudoun County Master Gardeners. http://loudouncountymastergardeners.org/

2, Thursday, Lecture: Glorious Shade: Dazzling Plants, Design Ideas, and Proven Techniques for your Shady Garden. 10:30 am. Fee and must register, book sale offered. Ladew Topiary Gardens, 3535 Jarrettsville Pike, Monkton, MD.  http://ladewgardens.org/

3, Friday, Gardener’s Focus: Specialty Mums, 2:45 pm. Fee is included in suggested donation. Also offered on Thursday 11/2, Tuesday 11/7, Thursday 11/9, and Friday 11/10.  Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

3, Friday, Special Event: Escape the Botanic Garden. Doors open 6:45 pm, 7:00 to 9:30 pm. Fee and must register.  Conservatory, U.S. Botanic Garden, 245 First Street, SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

3, Friday, Turning a New Leaf Conference, all day at the Hilton Washington Dulles Airport in Herndon, VA. Fee and must register. Hosted by the Chesapeake Conservation Landscaping Council.  http://www.chesapeakelandscape.org/our-programs/turning-a-new-leaf-conference/

4, Saturday, Lecture: 22 things your grandmother never told you about gardening by David Roos, 1:00 to 3:00 pm. Free but must register. Hosted by the Master Gardeners of Prince William County. Manassas Park Community Center, 99 Adams Street, Manassas Park, VA. http://www.mgpw.org

4, Saturday, Holiday and Winter Containers, 2 to 3:30 pm Free, advance registration requested. Offered twice, next time is November 1. Barrett Branch Library, 717 Queen Street, Alexandria.  Hosted by the Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

4, Saturday, Beginner Hands-on Bonsai Class, 2-4 pm. Fee and must register, Behnke Nurseries Garden Center, 11300 Baltimore Road, Beltsville, MD. http://www.behnkes.com/

4, Saturday, Rose pruning demonstration, putting your roses to bed, 9:30 to 11:30 am. Free but bring your shears. Hosted by the Maryland Rose Society.  In the rose garden at Cylburn Arboretum, 4915 Greenspring Avenue, Maryland. http://www.cylburn.org

4, Saturday, Free lectures at 10:00 am at various locations of Merrifield Garden Center, no registration necessary. See website for street addresses. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

  • Fair Oaks: Plan and Plant for spring: Trees and shrubs
  • Gainesville: Landscape Lighting

4, Saturday, Celebrating Natives Fall Garden Tour, self-guided driving tour of five private gardens and two public areas in and around Oxford, MD. These gardens demonstrate varying degrees of commitment to native plantings and use of sustainable practices. Fee and must register, Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, MD. http://www.adkinsarboretum.org.

4, Saturday, First Saturday Guided Walk, 10:00 to 11:00 am, free. Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, MD. http://www.adkinsarboretum.org.

4, Saturday from 1:30 to 5:00 pm; and 5, Sunday, from 9:00 am to 3:30 pm, National Capital Area Garden Clubs Inc. District 4 Flower Show. Free. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

4, Saturday, Aki Matsuri, Autumn Festival: Bonsai and Beyond, 9:00 am to 9:00 pm. All lectures, tours, and activities are free except for the evening Otsukimi Moon Viewing.  The Moon viewing has an admission fee and registration is required. See the website for the many activities. U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Avenue, NE, Washington, DC. http://www.usna.usda.gov

5, Sunday, Camellia Celebration, 10:30 am, free to attend with donations suggested to visit the gardens. Must register. Historic London Town and Gardens, 839 Londontown Road, Edgewater, MD.  http://www.historiclondontown.org/

6, Monday, Lecture: Selecting shrubs, 7:00 to 8:30 pm. Free, advance registration requested.  Burke Library, 4701 Seminary Road, Alexandria, VA.  Hosted by Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

7, Tuesday, Gardener’s Focus: Specialty Mums, 2:45 pm. Fee is included in suggested donation. Also offered on Tuesday, 11/2, Friday 11/3, Thursday 11/9, and Friday 11/10.  Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

8, Wednesday, Webinar: Handmade Holidays Creative Herbal DIY Gifts, 7:00 to 9:00 pm. Fee and must register. Smile Herb Shop. http://www.smileherb.com

8, Wednesday, Williamsburg Style Holiday Centerpiece, fee and must register. The Barn Series at Belle Grove Plantation, hosted by the Northern Shenandoah Valley Master Gardeners. Belle Grove Plantation, 336 Belle Grove Road, Middletown, VA. http://www.bellegrove.org  and  http://www.nsvmga.org

8, Wednesday, Lecture: Season Review and Winter Interest in the Garden, 7 to 8:30 pm. Free; registration is not necessary. Mt. Vernon Recreation Center, 2701 Commonwealth Avenue, Alexandria. Hosted by Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia and in partnership with Alexandria Beautification Commission.  http://www.mgnv.org

9, Thursday, Gardener’s Focus: Specialty Mums, 2:45 pm. Fee is included in suggested donation. Also offered on Thursday, 11/2, Friday 11/3, Tuesday 11/7, and Friday 11/10.  Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

10, Friday, Gardener’s Focus: Specialty Mums, 2:45 pm. Fee is included in suggested donation. Also offered on Thursday, 11/2, Friday 11/3, Tuesday 11/7, and Thursday 11/9.  Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

10, Friday, Meadowlark Winter Walk of Lights, ends Sunday January 7. Tickets required, fees and times vary. Meadowlark Botanical Gardens, 9750 Meadowlark Gardens Court, Vienna, VA.  https://www.novaparks.com/events/winter-walk-of-lights

11, Saturday, 9:30 to 4:30 pm; and 12, Sunday, 9:30 to 4:30 pm. Orchid Diagnostic and Repotting Clinic, free but for a fee Carol Allen will repot your orchid for you. Behnke Nurseries Garden Center, 11300 Baltimore Road, Beltsville, MD. http://www.behnkes.com/

11, Saturday, Free lectures at 10:00 am at various locations of Merrifield Garden Center, no registration necessary. See website for street addresses. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

  • Fair Oaks: The Thanksgiving Table
  • Gainesville: The Art of Pruning
  • Merrifield: Color and Interest in the Winter Garden

11, Saturday, Meet Marta McDowell, author of The World of Laura Ingalls Wilder: Bringing the Landscapes of Laura Ingalls Wilder to Life. Fee and must register, fee includes the book which can be signed by Marta. 2:00 pm. Hosted by the American Horticultural Society, River Farm, 7931 E. Boulevard Drive, Alexandria, VA.  http://www.ahsgardening.org

11, Saturday, Make a Symbolic Dried Christmas Wreath, 10:00 am to noon. Fee and must register. Willow Oak Flower and Herb Farm, 8109 Telegraph Road, Severn, MD. http://www.willowoakherbs.com

11, Saturday, Herbal Cordials, Vinegars, and Cocktails, 2:00 to 4:00 pm., fee and must register. Smile Herb Shop, 4908 Berwyn Road, College Park, MD. http://www.smileherb.com

14, Tuesday, Lecture: Relationship between Trees and Other Living Things by Cheryl Corson, 7:15 pm, free and open to the public. Capitol Hill Garden Club, the Northeast Library, 330 Seventh Street, NE, Washington DC. http://www.capitolhillgardenclub.org

14, Tuesday, Lecture: Restoring Nature’s Relationships at Home by Doug Tallamy, 7:30 to 9:00 pm. Open to the public, Horticultural Society of Maryland members are free, non-members pay a fee. Hosted by the Horticultural Society of Maryland. Vollmer Center, Cylburn Arboretum, 4915 Greenspring Avenue, Maryland. http://www.cylburn or http://www.mdhorticulture.org

15, Wednesday, Lecture: The Humane Gardener: Nurturing Habitat for Wildlife by Nancy Lawson, 7:30 to 9:00 pm. Free and open to the public, book signing included. Takoma Horticultural Society, Historic Takoma, 7328 Carroll Avenue, Takoma Park, MD.  http://www.takomahort.org

17, Friday, Thanksgiving Centerpiece Workshop, 10:00 am to noon, fee and must register Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, MD. http://www.adkinsarboretum.org

18, Saturday, Floral Workshop, Thanksgiving Table Arrangement, 9:30 am to 11:00 am. Fee and must register. Green Spring Gardens, 4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, VA. http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/greenspring

18, Saturday, Soup ‘n Walk, 11:00 am to 1:30 pm, fee and must register, Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, MD. http://www.adkinsarboretum.org

18, Saturday, Mixed Winter Container, 10:00 to 11:30 am, fee and must register. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

18 Saturday, lectures at 10:00 am at various locations of Merrifield Garden Center, no registration necessary. See website for street addresses. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

  • Fair Oaks: Designing a Small space for Outdoor Living
  • Gainesville: Holiday Wreath Workshop (fee and must register)
  • Merrifield: Decorating Your Home for the Holidays

18, Saturday, 10:00 am to 6:00 pm, and 19, Sunday, noon to 4:00 pm., Christmas Open House. On Saturday at 11:00 lecture on Holiday Sweets, for this must register and pay a fee. Willow Oak Flower and Herb Farm, 8109 Telegraph Road, Severn, MD. http://www.willowoakherbs.com

21, Tuesday, Thanksgiving Centerpiece, fee and must register, Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

23, Thursday, through January 1. Seasons Greetings Exhibit at the U.S. Botanic Garden, free. U.S. Botanic Garden, 245 First Street, SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

24, through 26, Friday through Sunday, Holiday Open House at all three locations, with Santa. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

24, Friday until January 1, Winter Display and Garden Railway Exhibit in South Conservatory. Free. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

25, Saturday, Behnke Christmas Open House, free. All day and from 10:30 to noon there will be a workshop on decorating your own fresh green Christmas wreath, must register and pay fee for this. Behnke Nurseries Garden Center, 11300 Baltimore Road, Beltsville, MD. http://www.behnkes.com/

25, Saturday, Make a Christmas Fairy Garden, 10:00 am to noon, fee and must register. Willow Oak Flower and Herb Farm, 8109 Telegraph Road, Severn, MD. http://www.willowoakherbs.com

28, Tuesday, Gardener’s Focus: Holiday Décor. 12:45 pm. Fee included in suggested donation. Also offered on 11/30. Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

30, Thursday, Workshop: Traditional Holiday Wreaths, fee and must register, 6:30 to 8:30 pm. Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

30, Thursday, Gardener’s Focus: Holiday Décor. 12:45 pm. Fee included in suggested donation. Also offered on 11/28. Hillwood Museum and Garden, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC.  http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

Continuing display of Desert Mums at Brookside Garden’s South Conservatory, until November 26 (Conservatory is closed on November 13). Free. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

In a Vase on Monday: Mums in Pumpkins

#inavaseonMonday

desktop arrangement: small chrysanthemums in a little pumpkin

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day: Pineapple Sage

Currently, my pineapple sage plants (Salvia elegans) are blooming in my garden, their bright scarlet flowers are attracting butterflies and hummingbirds. Members of the salvia or sage family, pineapple sage plants are herbaceous, tender perennial herbs. I have two pineapple sage plants, which I bought last year as tiny babies, and I often use their leaves and flowers in the kitchen.

From spring to fall this year, these plants grew fast, developing many lateral branches. Now they are 4-foot high shrubs, several feet wide. All season long, I harvested the leaves and used them fresh as well as dried them to store them. The leaves add a fruity flavor to many different types of beverages (makes a great hot tea), jellies, baking (line a pan with leaves before pouring the pound cake batter or cut leaves and add to batter), muffins, cookies, chicken dishes and chicken salads, butter, cream cheese, ice cream, sorbet, smoothies, etc.

From September to now, these large shrubs are blooming beautiful edible flowers that can be cut for a vase or used in the kitchen as well. Interestingly, the buds begin upside down. Red petals poke through a nodding green flower stalk and then as the stalk moves up more petals poke through until the stalk straightens up to be raceme of bright red tubular flowers. Pineapple sage flowers have the same type of sage or salvia bilabiate (two lips) flowers but larger. The flowers can be used as a garnish, frozen in ice cubes, beverages, fruit salads, butters, cookies, cupcakes, muffins, baked goods, and cream cheese.

In my garden, nothing seems to bother my pineapple sage plants. They are in moist, well-drained soil but one gets more sunlight than the other and I noticed that it has grown much bigger. They seem to prefer light dappled sun or morning sun and afternoon shade. They need space so they it is best to plant them in the back of the garden as long as there is a path to be able to pick the leaves and flowers. I have read that they are hardy to zone 7 and I have also read that they are hardy to zone 8. Surviving the winter is a 50-50 proposition here in my zone 7 Northern Virginia garden. Last winter, I did not do anything to protect them but the winter was mild so I was lucky that they survived. This year, after the frost kills the leaves, I will cut the plants back to stubbles and put down several inches of mulch to ensure their survival. If I had a sun room or a greenhouse, I could have taken cuttings a few months ago to pot up and bring inside.

If they don’t make it, I will buy more next year and will keep an eye out for cultivars such as Golden Delicious, which has golden yellow leaves; Tangerine, which has rounded leaves and a citrus scent; Frieda Dixon, which has salmon pink flowers; and Honeydew Melon, which has melon-scented red flowers with lime green leaves. Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, MD, has a stand of Golden Delicious plants that are blooming right now.

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day occurs on the 15th of the month. Garden bloggers around the world post their articles about blossoms in their garden. #gardenbloggersbloomday