Category Archives: subscribetonewsletter

Subscribe to DC Metro Area Gardening E-Newsletter

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, an e-newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. This free monthly communication lists recently published gardening books, articles, and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the upcoming April 2020 Pegplant’s Post, one lucky subscriber will win a voucher to redeem a 25-pound bag of Bloom, a specialty fertilizer rich in organic matter. The winner can redeem the voucher by visiting Homestead Gardens in Maryland or WS Jenks & Son or Annie’s Ace Hardware in DC.

I have written two articles about Bloom which is a soil conditioner made from Class A biosolids. Biosolids are organic matter, recycled from sewage, which have been treated and processed in order to use as a safe soil conditioner. Bloom comes from DC Water and is available bagged or in bulk. Bloom provides essential nutrients and increases drought resistance in plants and increases organic content in the soil. It is a fertilizer and compost in one product and can be added to garden beds or used in containers. It is safe to use for ornamental plants as well as edibles.

Gardening Events in the Washington DC Metro Area

free seed swap

At the end of the month, I list the gardening events for the next month in the Washington DC metro area. Last year, in 2019, there were more than 1,000 events and exhibits, which is an average of 90 per month or 3 per day. We have a lot of botanical activity in the Capital Region! I have just posted the March 2020 events and there are more than 100 events. The number increases as the gardening season warms up. To be in the know, you can either check my “Monthly Events” tab or you can subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, my free newsletter, to have the link to the Monthly Events sent to your e-mail box at the end of the month. This is a great resource for planning your social calendar.  It also enables you to reserve your spot in advance — some events are so popular they sell out fast. Plus my list is cumulative, thus serving as a resource if you are a garden club member looking for a speaker or a speaker looking for a venue. To give you an example, below are the activities for the upcoming 2 weeks. For the rest of March, click here.

Local Gardening Events from March 1-15, 2020

1, Sunday, Timeless Fragrance Gardening, Gainesville location, 1:00 pm and free. Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

1, Sunday, Sunday Funday House Plant Care Clinic, 11:00 am, free, sponsored by Rock Paper Plant and held at Femme Fatale popup shop, 401 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington DC. http://www.rockpaperplant.com/

1, Sunday, Garden Bed Planning Workshop, Fair Oaks location, 10:00 am, fee and must register. Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

2, Monday, Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show, 10:00 am to 10:00 pm, fee and must register. Also offered on Wednesday, March 4. Green Spring Gardens, 4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, VA. http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/greenspring

3, Tuesday, Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show, 10:00 am to 9:00 pm, fee and must register, Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, MD. http://www.adkinsarboretum.org

3, Tuesday, Stop! Smell and Touch Our Plants, 1 to 2:30 pm, free and registration required. Also offered on Saturday, March 7, at 10:30 am. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

3, Tuesday, Gardener’s Focus: An Orchid-Filled Greenhouse, 11:00 am or 1:00 pm, included in suggested donation to enter Hillwood. Also on many other days in March, check website for specific times. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC. https://www.hillwoodmuseum.org/

3, Tuesday, Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show, 8 am to 8 pm, fee and must register. Also offered on Thursday March 5, 9:00 am. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

3, Tuesday, Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show, 8:00 am to 9:00 pm, fee and must register. Homestead Gardens, 743 West Central Avenue, Davidsonville, MD. https://homesteadgardens.com/

3, Tuesday, Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show, via Alexandria or the Lothian store, fee and must register, Greenstreet Gardens, see website for times. https://greenstreetgardens.com/events/

3, Tuesday, Eat, Sleep, Garden: Top Annuals for Your Cut Flower Garden, 11:30 to 12:30 pm. Fee and must register. Greenhouse classroom, Cylburn Arboretum, 4915 Green Spring Avenue, Baltimore, MD http://cylburn.org/

3, Tuesday, Microgreens: What Are They, Why They Are So Fabulous, and How to Grow Them, 7 to 8:30 pm. Free and registration requested. Barrett Branch Library, 717 Queen Street, Alexandria. Sponsored by Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

4, Wednesday, Lecture: Horticulture and Women in History with Martha Keen. 7:00 pm, free, open to the public. Annapolis Horticulture Society, St. Anne’s Parish Hall, 199 Duke of Gloucester Street, Annapolis, MD. http://annapolishorticulture.org/lectures/

5, Thursday, Roots and Reflections: Orchids, 2 to 3:30 pm, free and registration required. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

5, Thursday, Political Appetites: Culinary Activities in the Early Republic with Nancy Siegel, 6:30 pm to 8:30 pm, fee and must register. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

5, Thursday, Tour: Medicinal Plants Yesterday and Today, 1:30 to 2:30 pm, free and will be offered again on March 12, same time. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

5, Thursday, Spring House Plant Swap, 6:30 pm, fee and must register. Sponsored by Rock Paper Plant and held at Femme Fatale popup shop, 401 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington DC. http://www.rockpaperplant.com/

5, Thursday, Bus Trip to Philadelphia Flower Show, 9:00 am to 9:00 pm, fee and must register. Also offered on March 3, Tuesday, 8:00 am. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

5, Thursday, Lecture: The Gardens of Spain, 7:00 pm, free. Rust Library, 380 Old Waterford Road, NW Leesburg, VA. Sponsored by the Loudoun County Master Gardeners. http://loudouncountymastergardeners.org/

5, Thursday, Grow What You Eat! 7 to 8:30 pm, free and registration requested. Arlington Mill Community Center, 909 S. Dinwiddie Street, Arlington. Also offered on Sunday, March 8. Sponsored by the Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia.  http://www.mgnv.org

6, Friday, HOAs and Condo Association: Sustainable Solutions to Landscaping Headaches, 9:30 am to 1:00 pm, free but must register. The Forum Meeting Room, Richard J. Ernst Community Cultural Center Building, Northern Virginia Community College Annandale Campus, 8333 Little River Turnpike, Annandale. Sponsored by Plant NOVA Natives, register at https://www.plantnovanatives.org/symposiums-for-hoa-and-condo-assoc-

6, Friday, Invasive Plant Workshop, 1 to 5:00 pm, fee and must register. Sponsored by the Blue Ridge Prism and held at Blandy Experimental Farm in Boyce, VA.  https://www.facebook.com/events/202662360920681/?active_tab=about
http://blandy.virginia.edu/home

7, Saturday, Plot Against Hunger 7th Annual Spring Garden Kick Off, 10:00 am to 2:00 pm, free but should rsvp. Arlington Central Library, 1015 N. Quincy Street, Arlington VA. https://afac.org/afac-events/plot-against-hunger-spring-garden-kick-off-2020/

7, Saturday, First Saturday Guided Walk, 10:00 am, free for members, free with admission for non-members. Adkins Arboretum, 12610 Eveland Road, Ridgely, MD. http://www.adkinsarboretum.org

7, Saturday, The Science of Spring Blooms, Merrifield location; Common Plant Problems and Solutions, Gainesville location; From Seed and Stem to Nursery, Fair Oaks location. All 10:00 am and free.  Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

7, Saturday, Gardening in the Valley Symposium, 8:00 am to 4:00 pm, fee and should register. Shenandoah University, Hester Auditorium, Henkel, 1460 University Drive, Winchester, VA. Sponsored by the Northern Shenandoah Valley Master Gardener Association. http://nsvmga.org/events/symposium/

7, Saturday, Stop! Smell and Touch Our Plants, 10:30 am to noon, free and registration required. Also offered on Tuesday, March 3, at 1:00 pm. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

7, Saturday, U.S. Botanic Garden Production Facility Open House, fee and must register, will be at various times and will be at the facility. See website for details. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

7, Saturday, Vegetable garden series (topic is managing pests, vegetable profiles, food safety). Part three of three topics, free but seating is limited so register at master_gardener@pwcgov.org. Other dates were February 1 and 15. Sponsored by Prince William Master Gardeners. Held at Bull Run Library, 8051 Ashton Avenue, Manassas, VA.  https://www.pwcgov.org/government/dept/vce/Pages/Horticulture-Classes.aspx

7, Saturday, The Basics of Gardening, Session Three: Rain Gardens, Insects, and Diseases and IMP. This is part three of a three session series, other sessions were on February 29 and March7. Free but space is limited, register at pwcgov.org/grow or e-mail master_gardener@pwcgov.org  Sponsored by Prince William Master Gardeners. Held at Haymarket Gainesville Community Library, 4870 Lightner Road, Haymarket, VA.  https://www.pwcgov.org/government/dept/vce/Pages/Horticulture-Classes.aspx

7, Saturday, Great Shrubs for Home Gardens, 10 to 11:30 am, fee and must register. Green Spring Gardens, 4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, VA. http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/greenspring

7, Saturday, Nine Ways You Can Help Bee and Other Pollinators at Home, 9:00 am to 10:00 am, free but make reservations. Loudoun Wildlife Conservatory. Held at Wild Birds Unlimited, 44110 Ashburn Shopping Plaza, Ashburn, VA. http://www.loudounwildlife.org

7, Saturday, Grow Your Own Microgreens, 11:00 am to noon, fee and must register. Cultivate the City, 910 Bladensburg Road Northeast, Washington DC. http://www.cultivatethecity.com

8, Sunday, Bon-Chi! Learn and Practice the Art of Bonsai Using Edible Plants, 1 to 2:00 pm, fee and must register. Cultivate the City, 910 Bladensburg Road, NE Washington DC. At the H Street Farms at W.S. Jenks and Sons. http://www.cultivatethecity.com

8, Sunday, The Art of Pruning Workshop at Fair Oaks location, 1:00 pm, fee and must register. Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

8, Sunday, Grow What You Eat! 3 to 4:30 pm, free and registration requested. Beatley Central Library, 5005 Duke Street, Alexandria. Also on Thursday, March 5, sponsored by Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

8, Sunday, Create and Sip: Succulent Potting Party at Gainesville location, 1:00 pm, fee and must register. Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

8, Sunday, through 10, Tuesday. Full Moon Hikes, 7:30 pm, fee and must register. Sponsored by the Friends of the National Arboretum, at the U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Avenue, Washington DC. https://www.fona.org/fullmoonhikes/

8, Sunday, through 10, Tuesday, Full Moon Forest Bathing, 7:30 pm, fee and must register. Sponsored by the Friends of the National Arboretum, at the U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Avenue, Washington DC. https://www.fona.org/fullmoonhikes/

9, Monday, Selecting Native Plants for your Home Garden, 7 to 8:30 pm, free, registration requested. Westover Branch Library, 1644 N. McKinley Road, Arlington. Sponsored by Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

10, Tuesday, Lecture: Botanical Bullies with Carole Bergmann, 7:30 to 9:00 pm, free for members, fee for nonmembers, and open to the public. Vollmer Center Auditorium, Cylburn Arboretum. Sponsored by the Maryland Horticultural Society. https://mdhorticulture.org/

11, Wednesday, Seed Starting and Plant Propagation. 7:00 pm, free. Bluemont Room, Arlington Central Library, 1015 N. Quincy Street, Arlington. Sponsored by the Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org
https://afac.org/plot-against-hunger/pah-events/

11, Wednesday, Not in Our Backyard: How to Fight Spotted Lanternfly, 7 to 8:30 pm, fee and must register at Sustainability Matters Facebook page. Sponsored by Sustainability Matters and will be at the Blandy Experimental Farm, 400 Blandy Farm Lane, Boyce, VA.
https://www.facebook.com/events/808773166253213/
http://blandy.virginia.edu/home

12, Thursday, Turf Talk: How to Have a Healthy Lawn, 7:00 to 8:30 pm, free and registration requested. Fairlington Community Center, 3308 S. Stafford Street, Arlington. Sponsored by the Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

12, Thursday, Workshop: Hypertufa Containers and Desert Plantings, 6:30 to 8:30 pm, fee and must register. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

12, Thursday, Mounted Orchids, 6:00 – 8:00 pm, fee and must register. Sponsored by Rock Paper Plant and held at Steadfast Supply (Navy Yard), 301 Tingey Street, #120 SE, entrance on water street, Washington DC. http://www.rockpaperplant.com/

12, Thursday, Piecing Together Nature’s Puzzle with Alonso Abugattas, 7:30 to 9:00 pm, free. Hosted by Potowmack Chapter of Virginia Native Plant Society. Held at Green Spring Gardens, 4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, VA. https://vnps.org/potowmack/events/natures-puzzle-the-interconnectedness-of-our-world-depending-on-plants-with-alonso-abugattas/

13, Friday, Houseplant Haven Grand Opening, 6:00 to 9:00 pm, free. Homestead Gardens, 743 West Central Avenue, Davidsonville, MD. https://homesteadgardens.com/

14 and 15, Saturday and Sunday, Homestead Gardens Spring Kick Off, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, free. Homestead Gardens, 743 West Central Avenue, Davidsonville, MD. https://homesteadgardens.com/

14, Saturday, Propagation and Cloning Workshop, 11:00 am to noon, fee and must register. Cultivate the City, 910 Bladensburg Road NE Washington DC, at H Street Farms at W.S. Jenks and Sons http://www.cultivatethecity.com

14, Saturday, Winter Pruning for Woody Plants, 1 to 2:30 pm, free and advance registration requested. 4029 N. Tazewell Street, Arlington. Rain date March 21. Also offered on March 29. Hands on training and outside. Bring your own tools. Sponsored by Master Gardeners of Northern Virginia. http://www.mgnv.org

14, Saturday, Lecture: Exploring Orchid Evolution, Ecology, and Biogeography with Todd Brethauer, 2 to 3:30 pm, free and registration required. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

14, Saturday, Lawn Care Q&A, Merrifield location; and Planting Herbs and Vegetables in Ground and in Containers, Fair Oaks location, both at 10:0 am and free. Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

14, Saturday, Workshop: Growing Vegetables in Containers, 2 to 3:00 pm. Fee and must register, space limited. The Greenhouse Classroom, Cylburn Arboretum, sponsored by the Maryland Horticultural Society. https://mdhorticulture.org/

14, Saturday, Orchid 101: How to Get Your Orchid to Rebloom, 10:00 am to noon, fee and must register. Also offered on 15, 20, 28, and 29. Check website for specific times. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC. https://www.hillwoodmuseum.org/

14, Saturday, Orchid Workshop: To Repot or Not? 2:00 to 4:00 pm, fee and must register. Also offered on 15, 27, and 29. Check website for specific times. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW Washington DC. https://www.hillwoodmuseum.org/

14, Saturday, How to Get Your Orchid to Rebloom, 1 to 2:30 pm, fee and must register. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

14, Saturday and 15, Sunday, Friends of Brookside Gardens Orchid Festival at Brookside Gardens, 10:00 am to 4:00 pm on Saturday and 10:00 am to 3:00 pm on Sunday. Brookside Gardens, 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD. http://www.brooksidegardens.org

14, Saturday, St. Patrick’s Day Floral Arrangement, 11:00 am, fee and must register. Willow Oak Flower and Herb Farm, 8109 Telegraph Road, Severn, MD. http://www.willowoakherbs.com

15, Sunday, Orchid Family Day, 1 to 4:00 pm, free and no registration required. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW, Washington DC. http://www.usbg.gov

15, Sunday, Hydroponics and Vertical Gardening, 1 to 2:00 pm, fee and must register. H Street Farms and 910 Bladensburg Road NE Washington DC. Cultivate the City. http://www.cultivatethecity.com

15, Sunday, Native Plant Picks for Spring, Gainesville location, and Lawn Care Q&A at Fair Oaks location, both at 1:00 pm and free. Merrifield Garden Center. http://www.merrifieldgardencenter.com

Subscribe to Local Gardening Newsletter for a Chance to Win CowPots

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, an e-newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. This free monthly communication lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, recently published gardening books, and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the upcoming March 2020 Pegplant’s Post, one lucky subscriber will win a package of CowPots. This is a combination of one #3 square 12-pack, one #4 square 12-pack, and one #3 six cell 3-pack.

CowPots are made on a third-generation family dairy farm in Connecticut. CowPots are biodegradable, plantable pots made from cow manure but they are odor and peat free. They are an alternative to plastic pots; however, eventually they degrade into the garden soil. Using CowPots provides better root penetration, air pruning, and reduces transplant shock. After you insert your transplant into the CowPot and water, the CowPot will remain intact for about 12-16 weeks, depending on the size. When you plant the transplant in the garden, plant the entire CowPot so the CowPot is buried in the soil. The CowPot will break down in one growing season. I have seen these for sale at the Ace stores in the Washington DC metro area but you also can order them online at Johnny’s Selected Seed, Gardener’s Supply Company, Gardener’s Edge, Territorial Seed, and Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. There are many sizes and styles.

Subscribe Now to Pegplant’s Post for a Chance to Win David Austin English Rose

One of David Austin’s English roses in the landscape. Photo courtesy of David Austin Roses.

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, an e-newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. This free monthly communication lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, recently published gardening books, and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the upcoming February 2020 Pegplant’s Post, one lucky subscriber will win a bare root English rose, courtesy of David Austin Roses.

A David Austin English rose needs no introduction. David Austin is one of the greatest rosarians and rose breeders in the world and the first to create a horticultural brand. In the early 1950s, David Austin began to create a more beautiful rose by combining the fragrance of old roses with the color range and repeat flowering habits of the modern roses. In 1961, he released his first commercial English rose, ‘Constance Spry’. Since then he has released more than 200 English roses. English roses are fragrant with many petals, creating a lush, full flower. The plants are disease resistant and bloom all season long.  The David Austin representative will work with the winner to determine the correct time for shipping and planting and to answer any questions about roses.

Pegplant’s Post: Gardening E-Newsletter for DC Metro Area

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, an e-newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. This free monthly communication lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, recently published gardening books, and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the upcoming January 2020 Pegplant’s Post, one lucky subscriber will win one Plantskydd quart bottle of a spray liquid that repels deer, rabbits, and voles and a one-pound granular repellent for rabbits, squirrels, and voles. If you are not already a subscriber, subscribe now for the opportunity to win these two products!

Plantskydd is a family of organic repellent products for gardeners as well as professional horticulturists to use to prevent damage to plants and gardens. The products are organic, made from porcine or bovine dried blood which has an offensive odor. The products can also be used to mask a sweet smell as mentioned in my October 2019 article on planting spring blooming bulbs. Soak the bulbs in Plantskydd so animals do not detect them and dig them up. Plantskydd repellents are safe for vegetable gardens and are rain and snow resistant so no need to constantly re-apply. Made in the United States, Plantskydd products can be ordered from their website or purchased at independent garden centers.

Subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, DC Metro Area Gardening E-Newsletter

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, a free e-newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Each issue lists the local gardening events for the month, recently published gardening books, and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features the opportunity to win a free plant or gardening product. For the December 2019 Pegplant’s Post, which will be e-mailed to subscribers on November 30, one lucky subscriber will win a Hip-Trug.

Many gardeners know or have Corona gardening tools. Recently Corona has been promoting several products from Burgon and Ball, their sister company in the U.K. I particularly like the Hip-Trug, because it is good for the back and knees–saves on bending and getting up and down. This large plastic container clips to the belt, pocket, or waistband, enabling gardeners to use both hands when harvesting veggies or deadheading flowers. The container slips in and out of the holster, making it easy to empty and clean. The holster is available in a moss green or navy blue color (the image is for illustrative purpose, the winner does not choose the color). Check out the other Burgon and Ball products on Corona’s website: Kneelo knee pads and the Kneelo kneeler.

The Corona company started in the 1920s with the invention of orange shears. The citrus industry was near the city of Corona in California. In the time it took to harvest and deliver the crop by train to the east coast, much of the fruit quality diminished thus decreasing sales. A Corona school teacher realized that most of the skin damage on the orange came from the oranges themselves. The fruit was harvested by hand, pulled from the tree, which resulted in openings in the skin and jagged stems. He designed a tool that could cut the fruit off right at the button of the fruit (where the stem connects to the fruit) thus eliminating openings and stems that poke and damage other fruit. He worked with a blacksmith to create the tool who then supplied the tool to the California citrus industry and thus the Corona company was born. Today, Corona Tools is the leading tool brand in Northern America, part of the global Venanpri Tools that includes sister companies Bellota and Burgon and Ball. Venanpri Tools is a family of consumer and professional tools for the lawn and garden, landscape, irrigation, construction, and agriculture markets.

Subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, a Newsletter for DC Metro Area Gardeners

Apricot Giant Tulip

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, a free monthly newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Each issue lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, lectures, and workshops; recently published gardening books; and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Subscribers have a chance to win a gardening product or plant every month.

For the November 2019 issue, we are doing something a little different for the giveaway. Instead of having one subscriber win one product, we are going to have five possible winners. Each person can receive 100 tulip bulbs. We have collaborated with Dutch Grown to give away a total of 500 tulips — five winners will get 100 of one variety. Winners cannot pick which variety, but it will be 100 of Apricot Giant, or Jumbo Cherry, or Strawberry Fields Collection, or Rainbow Parrot, or Apricot Parrot.

Rainbow Parrot Tulip

Established in 1882, Dutch Grown has been shipping and selling spring blooming bulbs from their family farm in Holland to growers in the United States. They launched their website in 2001 and in 2007 they were able to set up their online shop.  Initially only wholesale quantities were available for purchase online but they were able to provide retail prices by opening a warehouse in West Chester, PA. They ship bulbs from Holland to the warehouse in Pennsylvania and from this site they can deliver retail orders to gardeners and home owners. Their website has a blog, a question submission form, a bulb calculator, a zone finder, and several videos.

So if you are not a subscriber, subscribe now to Pegplant’s Post for a chance to win 100 bulbs. Read the November newsletter for details. All photos courtesy of Dutch Grown.

Apricot Parrot Tulip

Giveaway for October issue of Pegplant’s Post: Wild Valley Farms Wool Pellets

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, a free monthly newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Each issue lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, lectures, and workshops; recently published gardening books; and articles and tips specific to this immediate area. Each issue also features a giveaway and for the upcoming October 2019 issue we have collaborated with Wild Valley Farms to give away two 8 oz. bags of wool pellets. The wool pellets are compressed from all natural, 100% organic wool sheared from sheep at Wild Valley Farms in Salt Lake City, UT, and nearby ranchers. When the wool pellets are added to the soil, especially in containers and hanging baskets, the fibers naturally retain moisture and reduce the amount of time you have to water your containers. The expansion of wool pellets in the soil creates porosity, which aids in plant development. The wool also provides a natural source of nutrients: 9% nitrogen, 1% phosphorus, and 2% potassium. Only subscribers can enter the giveaway so sign up now for a chance to win two 8 oz. bags. Each is enough for 6 one-gallon pots or hanging baskets.

I met Albert Wilde, the owner, when I was in Salt Lake City a month ago. He explained that the idea came when his wife wanted to be able to spend less time watering her containers. As a sheep farmer, he looked around for what he could use on hand and added the waste wool (from shearing the sheep) to her containers’ soil. It worked but he began to notice that the plants actually grew better. He worked with local laboratories and discovered that the wool also delivers nutrients to the plants and increases porosity (like perlite). The plants can access the nutrients 30 days faster than other organic fertilizers. Wild Valley Farms also sells other products on their website, everything is made in the U.S.

Subscribe to Pegplant’s Post and Be Eligible To Win Six Peonies!

Cheddar Supreme

Enter your e-mail here to subscribe to Pegplant’s Post, a free monthly newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metropolitan area. Each issue lists 50 to 100 local gardening events, lectures, and workshops in MD, DC, and VA; recently published gardening books; and articles and tips specific to gardeners in this immediate area. Each issue also features a giveaway product or plant that one lucky subscriber can win. Look for your issue in your inbox during the last weekend of the month.

Bowl of Cream

For the giveaway in the upcoming August issue we have collaborated with Peony’s Envy to offer the White Peony Pack. This consists of two Henry Sass herbaceous peonies (the purest white bloom), two Bowl of Creams (very popular), and two Cheddar Supremes (a Klehm original with a hint of yellow). This is a total of six plants valued at $164!  Not only are the flowers fragrant, the plants are deer-resistant too! Only one subscriber will be able to win all six, which will be shipped directly from Peony’s Envy, bare root, in the fall.

Henry Sass

Peony’s Envy has the most extensive collection of tree, herbaceous, and intersectional peonies in the northeast. In addition, they have a display garden open to the public on a 7-acre, New Jersey property and a peony cutting garden. Check out their beautiful website — they sell all things related to peonies such as kitchen towels, jewelry, neckties, aprons, and notecards. Thank you Peony’s Envy for collaborating on such a generous and beautiful giveaway!

Photos courtesy of Peony’s Envy.

Heirloom Rose Giveaway to Pegplant’s Post Subscribers

Anne Hathaway, photo courtesy of Heirloom Roses

I am very excited about the giveaway for the July 2019 issue of Pegplant’s Post. Heirloom Roses has graciously offered a $65 gift card to one winner. The winner can pick the particular rose plant he/she wants for the garden. Heirloom Roses is a family-owned business in Oregon with a terrific online presence. They have every type of heirloom rose plus a lot of information on growing them, including videos. They also have related products for sale such as fertilizer, shears, gloves, and plant ties. All of their roses are grown on their own roots, no grafting. Even if you don’t win the gift certificate, check out their website to learn more about growing roses. This giveaway opportunity is for subscribers of Pegplant’s Post, an online, free newsletter about gardening in the Washington DC metro area. Each issue provides at least 50, and often more than 100, gardening events for the month; newly published gardening books; local tips, advice, and articles; and a monthly giveaway contest. Subscribe now by clicking here or visit pegplant.com and enter your e-mail address in the box above “subscribe!” on the right column. Pegplant’s Post will be issued on the last weekend of the month.