Tag Archives: seed catalogs

Seed Catalogs, Seed Catalogs, Get Your Seed Catalog!!

In anticipation of a great 2018 gardening season,  I have updated my list of seed catalogs on my website under the tab “seed catalogs” to include 38 companies. Note that many catalogs are free, just contact the company. I am starting to get seed catalogs in the mail but I usually wait until I have a quorum and then we sit down to chat. They say “buy me, buy me, I am new and better!” and I say “Yes, I want, I want, I want BUT do I have enough space? Do I have enough time?” And so it goes for weeks….

On the twelfth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the twelfth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a garden with good soil, perfect weather, and healthy plants! Merry Christmas!

On the eleventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

Espoma fertilizer!!

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

seed catalogs, to order seeds, plants, and gardening accessories!

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

On the eleventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the eleventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

Espoma fertilizer!!

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

seed catalogs, to order seeds, plants, and gardening accessories!

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

seed catalogs, to order seeds, plants, and gardening accessories!

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

Updated Source of Seed Catalogs for Upcoming 2017 Gardening Season!

seed-catalogsI updated my list of companies that produce seed catalogs on my seed catalogs tab. Note that a lot of catalogs are free (check their website), educational, and so visual — a great way to see the possibilities for this year’s growing season!

 

Seed Companies that mail print catalogs (online companies are listed at the end)

Adaptive Seeds http://www.adaptiveseeds.com

Baker Creek Heirloom Seed http://www.rareseeds.com

Botanical Interests http://www.botanicalinterests.com

Burpee http://www.burpee.com

Fedco Seeds http://www.fedcoseeds.com

Harris Seeds http://www.harrisseeds.com

High Mowing Seeds http://www.highmowingseeds.com

Hudson Valley Seed Library http://www.seedlibrary.org

John Scheepers Kitchen Garden Seeds http://www.kitchengardenseeds.com

Johnny’s Selected Seeds http://www.johnnyseeds.com

J.W. Jung Seed http://www.jungseed.com

Kitazawa Seed Company http://www.kitazawaseed.com

Park Seed http://www.parkseed.com

Peaceful Valley Farm and Garden Supply http://www.groworganic.com

R.H. Shumway http://www.rhshumway.com

Seeds of Change http://www.seedsofchange.com

Seed Savers Exchange http://www.seedsavers.org

Seeds from Italy http://www.growitalian.com

Select Seeds/Antique Flowers http://www.selectseeds.com

Southern Exposure Seed Exchange http://www.southernexposure.com

Sow True Seed http://www.sowtrueseed.com

Stokes Seeds http://www.stokeseeds.com

Territorial Seed Company http://www.territorialseed.com

Tomato Growers Supply Company http://www.tomatogrowers.com

Totally Tomatoes http://www.totallytomato.com

Urban Farmer http://www.ufseeds.com

Vermont Bean Seed http://www.vermontbean.com

Online Seed Companies

(companies that do not produce print catalog, order from web site)

American Meadows, Inc. http://www.americanmeadows.com

Renee’s Garden http://www.reneesgarden.com

Sample Seeds http://www.sampleseeds.com

You Can Grow Mache!

macheMache is simply a lettuce that likes cold weather. Easily grown from seed, mache is started in the autumn and allowed to grow during the winter until it gets too hot in the following spring and bolts (flowers). Like a bib lettuce, mache is a sweet, buttery tasting rosette set of leaves, low to the ground. The leaves are so sweet that a simple drizzle of vinaigrette is all that is needed for a salad.

Although mache leaves are starting to appear in the produce section of grocery stores, it is in fact an “old” edible. The French have been cultivating it since the 17th century, which is probably where Thomas Jefferson learned of it during his visits to France and started to grow it at Monticello. Also known as lamb’s lettuce and corn salad, mache is available from most seed catalogs that offer vegetables and lettuce.

I started my seeds at the end of August in large plastic containers on the deck because our Virginia August is so hot and dry that I wanted to be able to water consistently and easily with a watering can. Once the seedlings came up and the weather cooled down in October, I moved the transplants to a garden bed. This picture was taken in late January after many snow showers, icy rains, and temperatures in the teens. It will grow bigger as temperature and day length increases. I have heard it can tolerate zero degrees and I like the fact that I don’t need to cover it with a plastic hoop. Mache is very nutritious, it has more omega 3 than any other leafy green except for purslane and it contains lutein (promotes eye health). It is high in vitamin A, C, and zinc, and provides almost as much iron as spinach but does not contain spinach’s oxalic acid (oxalic acid interferes with calcium absorption). Don’t forget to include a package of mache seeds with your seed order this year. You Can Grow That!

You Can Grow That! is a collaborative effort by gardeners around the world to encourage others to grow something. Gardeners usually post articles on their blog on the fourth day of the month (fourth day, four words: #1: You; #2: Can; #3: Grow; #4: That). Click on the logo below to read more posts.

Youcangrowthat

GMO or GE Seeds? What’s the Difference?

GMOI love seed catalogs. Reading them is an easy, simple way to learn about growing plants and new plants. I grow many of my edibles from seed; it’s fun, economical, and rewarding. But I am not willing to pay extra for the “non-GMO” or “GMO-free” claim I see on almost every catalog now. Even more importantly, seed catalogs should make it clear that they are offering non-GE seed, which isn’t even available to the home gardeners anyway so they are not really “offering” any more than the next seed catalog.

GMO stands for “Genetically Modified Organism.” According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), a GMO is “an organism produced through genetic modification.” Genetically modified organisms can occur naturally or can be created by people through traditional breeding methods. For example, some plants will produce variegated leaves on their own, a desirable characteristic. Or some people will breed a plant in their backyard for a particular trait. The Mortgage Lifter tomato, an heirloom, was created when a person choose plants that had large tomatoes and bred them together to make even larger tomatoes.  The resulting plant was so good, he was able to sell the seedlings and pay off his mortgage. Many of the “new” plants for the year are bred by companies for particular characteristics, for example, most of the new flowering annuals are bred for particular flower colors.  The newest petunia flower color was created by modifying genetics from parent petunias to create a hybrid that produced a particular new shade of pink.

GE stands for “Genetically Engineered,” i.e., an organism that was produced through genetic engineering. According to the USDA, genetic engineering is the “manipulation of an organism’s genes by introducing, eliminating, or re-arranging specific genes using the methods of modern molecular biology, particularly those techniques referred to as recombinant DNA.” New plants are produced by combining the DNA of a plant with something else that is not related and/or is not sexually compatible. These combinations would not normally occur in nature. For example, corn seed modified with a soil bacterium to protect the corn from corn borers or soybean that is herbicide resistant. These are human creations that can only occur by scientists, in labs, with special equipment. In our country, this is done with agricultural crops, not the seed or plants that home gardeners use.

Technically, the USDA definition of GMO is broad enough to include GE. What many people object to are GE crops; they are concerned about safety and long term effects. There are no safety concerns with genetically modified organisms so it is unfortunate that many seed catalogs use the term GMO when they mean to say GE. Seed catalogs should be clear:  they are not selling GE seeds; they are selling GMO seeds if they are selling hybrids, including open pollinated hybrids. In many of my catalogs, on one page it says “GMO free” and “we never sell genetically modified seed” yet on the subsequent pages it says “a decade in the breeding,” or “hybrid”, or “the result of a lifetime of fine breeding.” Breeding means you are working with genetics to create a desirable trait so you have genetically modified the organism but this does not mean you have created something dangerous and unsafe. It means they used traditional, horticultural practices, not recombinant DNA of a plant and a non plant.

Another point: grafted plants, such as grafted tomatoes and grafted apple trees are not GMO or GE. They are the union, a physical union, between two plants. It is a simple process of placing a wounded or the open wounds of two plant parts together and letting the tissues heal so that the cells fuse together. This is a very old horticultural practice that is done manually. A grafted plant takes advantage of what the root stock, the ground part, has to offer (maybe resistance to nematodes) and what the top or scion has to offer (delicious fruit). Even the new Ketchup ‘n’ Fries, a grafted union of a tomato and a potato plant, is not a GMO or a GE. But more on grafted vegetables in a future article, stay tuned!

The following graphic was created by The Chas. C. Hart Seed Co., http://www.hartseed.com

GE Free Semantics