Tag Archives: American Horticultural Society

On the twelfth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the twelfth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a garden with good soil, perfect weather, and healthy plants! Merry Christmas!

On the eleventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

Espoma fertilizer!!

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

seed catalogs, to order seeds, plants, and gardening accessories!

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

On the eleventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the eleventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

Espoma fertilizer!!

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

seed catalogs, to order seeds, plants, and gardening accessories!

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the tenth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

seed catalogs, to order seeds, plants, and gardening accessories!

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the ninth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…

to go to all of the gardening events, lectures, and workshops throughout the year in the Washington DC metro area.

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get…..

On the eighth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

American Horticultural Society‘s bone china floral mugs!

On the seventh day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

vertical structures and containers from local independent garden centers.

On the sixth day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

membership to the Garden Conservancy, the 2018 Open Days Directory, and the book of six Open Day tickets for 2018.

On the fifth day of Christmas gardeners love to get … an Earthbox.

On the fourth day of Christmas, gardeners love to get …

tickets to the PHS Philadelphia Flower Show in March 2018.

(image courtesy of GMR Design LLC)

On the third day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

gardening gloves, especially a pair of Foxgloves!

On the second day of Christmas gardeners love to get …

a Hudson Valley Seed Company 2018 Calendar.

 

On the first day of Christmas gardeners love to get . . .

tickets to the Virginia Historic Garden Week in April 2018!

 

What’s the Perfect Holiday Gift for Gardeners? Award-Winning Gardening Books!

If you are looking for a holiday gift for the gardener in your life, look to the American Horticultural Society’s (AHS) award winning books for 2017. For more than two decades, the AHS has recognized outstanding gardening books published in North America with its annual book award program. AHS is an educational, non-profit organization dedicated to making America a nation of gardeners, a land of gardens. Books are judged by the AHS Book Award Committee on qualities such as writing style, authority, originality, accuracy, and design quality. This year’s five recipients are:

Contact your local bookstore to purchase.  For more information about the awards program and books that have received awards in past years, visit www.ahsgardening.org/awards.

*Thomas Christopher does not have a website at this time but he is on Facebook.

Give an Award-Winning Gardening Book for the Holidays

9781604695533r A great source of gift ideas for the gardeners in your life is the American Horticultural Society’s annual book award program. The American Horticultural Society is an educational, non-profit organization dedicated to making America a nation of gardeners, a land of gardens.  Over the last two decades, they have been recognizing outstanding gardening books published in North America. Books are judged by the AHS Book Award Committee on qualities such as writing style, authority, originality, accuracy, and design quality. The five recipients for 2016 are:

  • The Art of Gardening by the Chanticleer Gardeners and R. William Thomas (Timber Press)
  • How Plants Work by Linda Chalker-Scott (Timber Press)
  • Planting in a Post-Wild World by Thomas Rainer and Claudia West (Timber Press)
  • The Seed Garden edited by Lee Buttala and Shanyn Siegel, with contributors Micaela Colley and Jared Zystro (Seed Savers Exchange)
  • Seeing Seeds by Robert Llewellyn and Teri Dunn Chace (Timber Press)

9781604693386rThe 2016 Book Award Committee was comprised of the following seven members: Jeff Cox, a garden communicator and designer in Sonoma County, CA; Rita Hassert, a botanical librarian at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL; Susan Hines, a garden communicator in Hyattsville, MD; Jim Long, garden communicator and owner of Long Creek Nursery in Blue Eye, MO; Mary Ann Newcomer, a garden communicator in Boise, ID; Doug Oster, a garden columnist for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and radio personality based in Pennsylvania, PA; and Anne Marie Van Nest, a garden communicator and horticulturist in the Niagara Falls area of New York.

Proud Owner of Baby, Bare-Root Tree Seedlings: Cornelian Cherry and Redbud

trees

Cornelian Cherry (left) and Redbud (right) in mid-May

Those of you who visited the Leesburg Flower and Garden Festival this past April might have received free, bare-root, tree seedlings. I received a cornelian cherry (Cornus mas) from Bartlett Tree Experts and an eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis) from the Tree Commission of the Town of Leesburg. When I got home that day, I placed them in containers, watered, and placed them in the shade.  They were already stressed, a little dried out, and being rootless, they had no mechanism to take up water. I watered about every other day and then of course it rained so much there was no need but gradually the trees develop roots and leaves emerged. At first, I placed the pots in the shade to minimize transpiration and when I saw leaves, I put them in morning shade and afternoon sun. Now that they are leafed out and obviously functioning and surviving, I will put them in full sun. I started with containers instead of straight into the ground because to have control over water/moisture and because I did not know where to plant them at the time.

In the fall, when the temperatures have cooled but the soil is still warm, I will transplant the cornelian cherry in the front yard that is mostly sun. It will grow to about 15 to 20 feet high and wide and has the potential to spread a little by suckers so I will plant it off to the side of the property near the fence. Cornelian cherry blooms yellow flowers in March before the leaves emerge and is known for its bright red fruit, similar to cherries. These are edible but probably best in a jam which I am looking forward to making if the birds don’t beat me to it. Grown as a small tree or hedge, this member of the dogwood family does not seem to be as disease prone as flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), tolerates clay soil, and can be grown in full sun to partial shade.

redbud

Redbud blooming in April at the American Horticultural Society’s River Farm

The redbud also blooms in the spring before the leaves emerge but the flowers are very small and purple/pink. Redbud grows much bigger, up to 30 feet high and wide. The “fruit” is a long brown pod, similar to a pea pod but larger and flat. Unfortunately, I don’t have the space for this tree so I may give it to a friend.

Kudos to Bartlett Tree Experts and the Town of Leesburg Tree Commission, not only did they give away free trees but they also provided information on planting trees. Bartlett’s tag said to “choose a spot with good soil where your tree will be in the sun and have plenty of room to grow on all sides. Dig a hole as deep as the root system and wide enough to accommodate future root growth (about two feet wide). Place the seedling in the hole so that the top of the root system is even with soil level and back fill with soil from the hole. Water after planting and every other week during the warmer months.”

The Town of Leesburg Tree Commission provided a handout with instructions for the bare root and for planting a large tree. A bare-root tree seedling has to soak in water for “3 to 6 hours” then “dig a hole, wider than seems necessary, so the roots can grow outward without crowding. Remove any grass within a 3-foot circular area. To aid root growth, turn soil in an area up to 3 feet in diameter. Plant the tree at the same depth it stood in the nursery, with plenty of room for the roots. Partially fill the hole, firming the soil around the lower roots. Do not add soil amendments such as peat or bark. Do not use fertilizer, potting soil, or chemicals on your new trees.” Then shovel in remaining soil, water, and mulch, and keep the soil and mulch moist but not soggy.

So the next time someone gives you a free, bare-root seedling, pot it up and water and coddle it until it can stand on its own feet. Then research the plant to learn its cultural requirements, determine the best place in your garden, and use the sage planting advice above. Good luck!

Peg’s Picks December Gardening Events in the Washington DC Metro Area

Many public gardens and historic homes are decorated for Christmas and have wreath making classes, open houses, and gift shops full of goodies. Here is just an example of “green” holiday happenings in the Washington DC metropolitan area for December.November2014 082

American Horticultural Society at River Farm

December 13 Saturday Holiday Open House from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm (mansion will be decorated for Christmas); There is a holiday tree display from December 1 through December 24, both free; 7931 E. Boulevard Drive, Alexandria, VA 22308; (703) 768-5700; http://www.ahs.org

Brookside Gardens

The Garden of Lights is cancelled for 2014 due to construction but the Conservatory Winter Display is open from 12/6 to 1/11 and the Garden Railway Exhibit is open from 11/28 to 1/11, free; 1800 Glenallan Avenue, Wheaton, MD 20902; (301) 962-1400; http://www.montgomeryparks.org/brookside/

Green Spring Gardens

Sunday, December 7, noon to 4:00 pm, Gardeners’ Holiday Open House, free but must register and pay for puppet show and trackless train ride, have a gingerbread house contest; 4603 Green Spring Road, Alexandria, VA 22312; (703) 642-5173; http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/parks/greenspring/November2014 085

Hillwood Museum and Gardens

Decorated for Christmas and in December, every Tuesday, Friday and Saturday, staff horticulturist Bill Johnson gives a 20-minute tour focusing on the “bones” of the winter garden; Fee and register in advance; 4155 Linnean Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20008; (202) 686-5807; http://www.hillwoodmuseum.org

Mt. Vernon Estate and Gardens

Decorated for Christmas with special activities all month long.The “Garden and Groves: George Washington’s Landscape at Mt. Vernon” exhibit is inside and the admission is included with the purchase of the general admission ticket;3200 Mt. Vernon Memorial highway, Mt. Vernon, VA 22121; (703) 780-2000; http://www.mountvernon.orgNovember2014 078

Oatlands Historic House and Gardens

Decorated for Christmas in 1940s style, many activities in December; Admission fee and closed on 12/24 and 12/25; 20850 Oatlands Plantation Lane, Leesburg, VA 20175; (703) 777-3174; http://www.oatlands.org

Tudor Place Historic House and Garden

The mansion is decorated for Christmas and there are many activities in December (fee). The Holidays Through History Open House is on Saturday, December 6; includes Dumbarton House, Anderson House, Woodrow Wilson House, and Tudor Place. These homes are decorated for Christmas; walk among the homes or ride a shuttle bus, free with ticket. Must register in advance, fee; 1644 31st Street, Washington, DC 20007; (202) 965-0400; http://www.tudorplace.orgNovember2014 076

U.S. Botanic Garden

Season’s Greetings Exhibit: garden railway model trains, seasonal plant displays, replicas of the capital’s landmark buildings, and one of the largest indoor decorated trees in the area. Free; 245 First Street SW, Washington DC 20024; (202) 225-8333; http://www.usbg.gov

 

(December is also the time for craft fairs. These photos are from the Vienna Art and Craft show sponsored by the Northern Virginia Handcrafters Guild, this Thanksgiving weekend. These orchids and the basket of fruit are clay, about two inches tall and handmade by Wanpen Yongvanichjit, Nid’s Crafts, http://nidscrafts.blogspot.com. When I was young and lived in Thailand, my mother used to buy orchids in similar crates and hang them outside on the rubber tree.)

 

 

Learn More About Gardening – Join a Garden Club!

There are many local garden clubs, societies, and organizations in the Washington DC metropolitan area. When summer ends and school starts, it seems that many garden clubs get back into business again, ready to have meetings and host great events! Because we have so many organizations it is hard to list them all here but to find a club near you, it is best to go to a larger umbrella organization to inquire about the local unit, or search on the internet by plant name or city (for a neighborhood garden club), or visit related sites such as public gardens. See the other pages (tabs) on my blog for local public gardens and nurseries; they also can serve as resources for finding local clubs.

The American Horticultural Society is a national membership organization but its physical location is called River Farm, 7931 East Boulevard Drive, Alexandria, VA  22308, (703) 768-5700 or 1-800-777-7931; http://www.ahs.org. The property is open to the public (call first); they have beautiful gardens, a children’s garden, and picnic benches (is on the Potomac River). The web site lists plant societies including native plant societies, clubs, and organizations. http://ahs.org/gardening-resources/societies-clubs-organizations.

The blog section of the web site for Behnkes Nurseries, in Beltsville, MD, lists Maryland garden clubs such as the Beltsville Garden Club, Silver Spring Garden Club, Takoma Horticulture Club, Brookland Garden Club, Burtonsville Garden Club, and Four Seasons Garden Club. There also is an Annapolis Horticultural Society, Hyattsville Horticultural Society, and a Maryland Horticultural Society. http://blog.behnkes.com.

The National Garden Clubs, Inc., is at 4401 Magnolia Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63110; (314) 776-7574; http://www.gardenclub.org.  There are 50 State Garden Clubs and the National Capital Area Club and hundreds of member garden clubs. In this area, the state level clubs are: Virginia Federation of Garden Clubs, headquarters is at Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden, 1800 Lakeside Avenue, Richmond, VA 23228; (804) 262-9887; http://www.virginiagardenclubs.org. Federated Garden Clubs of Maryland, Inc., is at 4915 Greenspring Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21209; (410) 396-4842; http://www.fgcofmd.org.  National Capital Area Garden Clubs is at the Arbor House, U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Avenue, NE, Washington, DC 20002; (202) 399-5958; http://www.ncagardenclubs.org. Contact them for a local unit near you.

The Garden Club of America is headquartered at 14 East 60th Street, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 10022; (212) 753-8287; http://www.gcamerica.org. Membership is by invitation only but contact the headquarters to see if there is a club near you.

The Garden Club of Virginia sponsors the annual Historic Garden Week in Virginia in April. Their headquarters is at the Kent-Valentine House, 12 East Franklin Street, Richmond, VA 23219; (804) 643-4137; http://www.gcvirginia.org

There probably is a native plant society in every state. In this area there is the Maryland Native Plant Society, which has a Washington DC chapter, and the Virginia Native Plant Society. Contact the Maryland Native Plant Society via P.O. Box 4877, Silver Spring, MD  20914; http://mdflora.org. Contact the Virginia Native Plant Society via 400 Blandy Farm Road, Unit 2, Boyce, VA 22620; (540) 837-1600; http://www.vnps.org.

There probably is an association for every type of plant and most have local chapters. Search the internet for the plant and related association or call your local public garden or extension office. The American Horticultural Society has a list of plant societies that you can contact to identify the local unit. For example, in our area we have the:

  • Camellia Society of Potomac Valley
  • National Capital Dahlia Society
  • National Capital Cactus and Succulent Society
  • National Capital Daylily Club
  • Brookside Gardens Chapter of the Azalea Society of America
  • Mason-Dixon Chapter (MD) & the Potomac Valley Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society
  • Arlington Rose Foundation
  • Maryland Daffodil Society and the Washington Daffodil Society

There are opportunities to volunteer at public gardens, which is like being a member of a garden club. For example, there is a Friends of Green Springs in Alexandria, VA; Friends of Brookside Gardens in Wheaton, MD; and the Friends of the National Arboretum. There is a similar organization called the All Hallows Guild of the Washington National Cathedral, which has extensive grounds and a garden. The Cathedral is located at Massachusetts & Wisconsin Avenues, NW, Washington, DC 20016; (202) 537-2937; http://www.cathedral.org/ahg.